Archive | January 2016

Weeeeeeeeek Threeeeeeeeeee

Week Threeminion
We are getting on our way. Our training program is zooming along and by the end of this week we are halfway to our first target; the week six point. We have a full compliment of attendance so far and I am hoping that those of you who might miss a session or two do not fold up the tent. Come a talk with a leader or me and we will get you back on track.

Ideally, you will always be able to complete all 3 training sessions each week. Of the 3 sessions, #1 is most important because it involves progression. So if you have to miss Session #1, try to complete that workout on your own in place of #2 or #3. That way you’ll be better prepared for the next week’s progressions.   <

Walk10K/Nordic Walk10K Program

Session 1 54 min.

  • Warm-up: Walk slow & easy for 15 min.
  • 1 min. brisk walk followed by 2 min. slow & easy recovery walk. Do this combination 8 times.
  • Cool-down: Walk slow & easy for 15 min.

Session 2 40 min.

  • Warm-up: Walk slow & easy for 5 min.
  • Walk for 30 min. Cool-down:
  • Walk slow & easy for 5 min.

Session 3 50 min.

  • Warm-up: Walk slow & easy for 5 min.
  • Walk for 40 min.
  • Cool-down: Walk slow & easy for 5 min.

LearnToRun10K Program

Session 1 45 min.

  • Warm-up: Walk slow & easy 5 min.
  • Run 3 min. Walk 2 min. Do this 7 times.
  • Cool-down: Walk slow & easy 5 min.

Session 2 34 min.

  • Warm-up: Walk slow & easy 5 min.
  • Run 2 min. Walk 2 min. Do this 6 times.
  • Cool-down: Walk slow & easy 5 min.

Session 3 40 min.

  • Warm-up: Walk slow & easy 5 min.
  • Run 3 min. Walk 2 min. Do this 6 times.
  • Cool-down: Walk slow & easy 5 min.

Run10KStronger Program

Session 1 50 min.

  • Warm-up: Run slow & easy 10 min.
  • 1 min. brisk run followed by 2 min. slow & easy recovery run. Repeat this combination 10 times.
  • Cool-down: Run slow & easy 10 min.

Session 2 30 min.

  • Warm-up: Run slow & easy 5 min.
  • Run 20 min.
  • Cool-down: Run slow & easy 5 min.

Session 3 40 min.

  • Warm-up: Run slow & easy 5 min.
  • Run 35 min.
  • Cool-down: Run slow & easy 5 min.

St. Patricks Day 5km

StPat

I woke up one morning to find an email in my inbox marked urgent. Dear Ken, we would like to thank you for volunteering to lead a St Patrick’s Day team……and it goes on…….

signed the race director.

Funny thing, same a last year, I really was “Volunteered” by a good friend because of the team numbers from last year he says. So, my due diligence will be done today. I will be entered into this run which is on a Saturday, the last day we should be putting in session three so if you would like to join me and the Running Room for a nice 5k and a beer. Oh, there….that has perked you up. And did I mention that you can wear green, and look sill….. and not stand out in a crowd. Yup we are green to the gills both during and after the run.

To invite team members to join West 4th Running Room please send them the following link: https://www.events.runningroom.com/applications/?raceId=12601&eventId=37630&vrindex=3
In order for them to become a member of your team they will need to supply your team password.
This password is: keh54net

Just saying……

Chia Pets

Chia

Runner’s Fuel: Peanut Butter Chia Bites

Peanut Butter Chia Bites

National Peanut Butter Day is January 24th! Peanut butter is cholesterol free and an excellent source of protein. Runners love peanut butter because it’s full of fat, protein and fiber, and releases energy slowly into the blood stream. This makes peanut butter a great pre-run fueling choice. Many runners swear by a winning breakfast formula of bagel, peanut butter, banana and coffee.

In honor of National Peanut Butter Day, I’m going to share with you one of my favorite snacks, Peanut Butter Chia Energy Bites. These tasty little snack balls are fun to eat, easy to make, and will give you the lift you need to make it through your next long run. Enjoy!

Peanut Butter Chia Energy Bites

Yields 45Total Time: 15 min

Ingredients

1 cup oats
2 T chia seeds
1/2 cup shredded coconut
1/3 cup mini chocolate chips
1/4 cup wheat germ
1/2 cup peanut butter
1/3 cup honey
1 T vanillaPeanut Butter Chia Bites

Instructions

  • In a medium bowl, combine the oats, chia seeds, shredded coconut, mini chocolate chips, and wheat germ.
  • Stir in the peanut butter, honey, and vanilla until well combined.
  • Roll into small balls and place on parchment paper.
  • Refrigerate for 1-2 hours and then store covered in the refrigerator.

Recipe by Tina Saltmarsh

NUTRITION: from Cristina

CARBS – GLYCEMIC INDEX, NOT GLUTEN FREE!
Never before has there been so much confusion and controversy about gluten, flour and carbs. We see so many foods labelled “gluten free,” that it’s made us question whether this thing called “gluten” is something we should all be avoiding? Allow me to clarify.

The Truth About Gluten 

Gluten itself is not bad. Gluten is a protein found in wheat and in both, healthy carbs like sprouted grain bread, and more refined unhealthy carbs like donuts. Some people who have been diagnosed with celiac disease or a gluten sensitivity can have a reaction to gluten and of course, these people should avoid gluten, but for the rest of us, gluten should be just fine.

The Truth About Carbs

We all need carbs to give us energy and to fuel exercise. There are both healthy and unhealthy carbs. Healthy carbs like brown rice, whole wheat pasta, sprouted grain bread, steel cut oats and sweet potatoes contain important nutrients like fibre, protein, B vitamins, iron, zinc and magnesium. Unhealthy carbs like white bread, white rice and cereal bars are made from highly refined flour that removed the nutritious germ and fibrous bran and are lacking these nutrients. Beware that gluten free foods are often not as nutritious as whole grains because they are often made from a refined white rice flour that has no fibre, protein or minerals.

The Glycemic Index

Here’s a new term that is more meaningful than gluten-free – The Glycemic Index (GI) defines how quickly a food releases sugar into your body. High GI foods like an iced mocha drink spike your blood sugar much like how kindling fuels a fire, but then burns out quickly leading to another sugar craving. Low GI foods like whole wheat pasta provide a steady release of sugar, much like how a log fuels a fire for a long time. Choosing low GI carbs that are high in fibre and protein and low in sugar will give you lasting energy to sustain you past afternoon cravings and well into your evening jog. Great choices include: Quinoa, brown rice, steel cut oats, sprouted grain bread and fresh fruit.

Cristina Sutter
Registered Dietitian

Cristina Sutter is a Private Practice Sport Dietitian at Optimal Performance Clinic in Vancouver. For more information, visit cristinasutter.ca.

Week Three from Lynn

Tips for Success

1. Be honest about your current fitness level. Choose the right program for yourself.

2. Be patient. Most people tend to do too much, too fast, too soon. Remember that you should always finish feeling like you could have done more.

3. Stick to the schedule. No more and no less. It is a successful program.

4. Make sure you have good supportive shoes when you start the program. It will help your success and prevent injury.

5. Stay at a nice easy talking pace most of the time. If you are unable to string a few sentences together in conversation, then you are going too fast for yourself. Slow down!

6. It’s your arm action that sets the pace and maintains your rhythm. Pump those arms and the legs will follow.

7. Keep a logbook and record your successes. It will keep you motivated.

8. Do a dynamic warm up to get the circulation going.

9. Do a stretch afterwards in your cool down. It will help prevent injury.

10. Invite a friend or canine creature to follow the program with you. It will be fun to share in the experience and help keep you motivated.

11. Remind yourself why you Walk or Run:

  • It is fun and enjoyable.
  • It is excellent for heart health.
  • It builds healthy bones.
  • It improves mood and reduces stress.
  • It increases flexibility.
  • It is an effective way to control weight.
  • It is a good form of transportation.
  • It is good for the environment.
  • You can do it anywhere anytime.
  • All you need is a tried-and-true training program, good coaching advice and proper shoes.

You’re on your way with week 3!

Lynn Kanuka
Olympian & SportMedBC’s RunWalk Coach

Week2

Walk10K/Nordic Walk10K Program

Session 1 40 min.

  • Warm-up: Walk slow & easy for 10 min.
  • 2 min. brisk walk followed by 2 min. slow & easy recovery walk. Do this combination 5 times.
  • Cool-down: Walk slow & easy for 10 min.

Session 2 30 min.

  • Warm-up: Walk slow & easy for 5 min.
  • Walk for 20 min. Cool-down:
  • Walk slow & easy for 5 min.

Session 3 40 min.

  • Warm-up: Walk slow & easy for 5 min.
  • Walk for 30 min.
  • Cool-down: Walk slow & easy for 5 min.

 

LearnToRun10K Program

Session 1 38 min.

  • Warm-up: Walk slow & easy 5 min.
  • Run 2 min. Walk 2 min. Do this 7 times.
  • Cool-down: Walk slow & easy 5 min.

Session 2 31 min.

  • Warm-up: Walk slow & easy 5 min.
  • Run 1 min. Walk 2 min. Do this 7 times.
  • Cool-down: Walk slow & easy 5 min.

Session 3 34 min.

  • Warm-up: Walk slow & easy 5 min.
  • Run 2 min. Walk 2 min. Do this 6 times.
  • Cool-down: Walk slow & easy 5 min.

 

Run10KStronger Program

Session 1 44 min.

  • Warm-up: Run slow & easy 10 min.
  • 2 min. brisk run followed by 2 min. slow & easy recovery run. Repeat this combination 6 times.
  • Cool-down: Run slow & easy 10 min.

(Note: Brisk running means you should not be able to speak any more than 2 sentences at one time. Any more and you’re going too slow, any less and you’re going too fast.)

Session 2 30 min.

  • Warm-up: Run slow & easy 5 min.
  • Run 20 min.
  • Cool-down: Run slow & easy 5 min.

Session 3 40 min.

  • Warm-up: Run slow & easy 5 min.
  • Run 30 min.
  • Cool-down: Run slow & easy 5 min.

 

Recovery Nutrition

-from SportsDietian.com

How important is recovery nutrition after exercise?

The importance of recovery nutrition depends on the type and duration of exercise just completed, body composition goals and personal preferences. The goals of the recovery nutrition are to:

  • Appropriately refuel and rehydrate the body
  • Promote muscle repair and growth
  • Boost adaptation from the training session
  • Support immune function

Proactive recovery nutrition is especially important if you complete two or more training sessions in one day or two sessions in close succession (e.g. evening session followed by early morning session the next day). However, if you’re exercising once a day or a couple of times a week, recovery nutrition is still important but you may be able to meet your nutrition goals from your usual meals or snacks than adding in extra food.

What can go happen if I get my recovery nutrition wrong?

  • Inadequate nutrition recovery, especially if training multiple times a day, can result in:
  • Increased fatigue (during training and at work or school)
  • Reduced performance at your next training session or event
  • Suboptimal gains from the session just completed
  • Increased muscle soreness

How soon after exercise should I be eating and drinking?

Rehydrating should begin soon after finishing your training session or event, however, the urgency for carbohydrate and protein after exercise depends on how long you have until your next exercise session. The body is most effective at replacing carbohydrate and promoting muscle repair and growth in the first ~60-90min after exercise, however this will continue to occur for another ~12-24hr. So, if you have a quick turn around between sessions it’s a good idea to maximise your recovery in the first 60-90 minutes after you finish exercising. Otherwise you could use your next regular meal after the session as your recovery nutrition. Some people may benefit from splitting their recovery into two parts with a small snack soon after exercise to kick start the recovery process followed by their next main meal to complete their recovery goals.

What should I be eating after exercise?

Everyone is different in what they like to eat, what their appetite is like and what sits comfortably in their stomach in the hours after exercise but in general foods should:

  • Be rich in quality carbohydrate to replenish muscle fuel stores
  • Contain some lean protein to promote muscle repair
  • Include a source of fluid and electrolytes to rehydrate effectively

There’s no one “best” option for what to eat after exercise. Dairy foods such as flavoured milk, smoothies or fruit yoghurt can be a great option as they can provide carbohydrate, protein, fluid and electrolytes ticking all of your recovery goals in one handy option. Some other options that you may like to choose include:

  • Lean chicken and salad roll
  • Bowl of muesli with yogurt and berries
  • Fresh fruit salad topped with Greek yogurt
  • Spaghetti with lean beef bolognaise sauce
  • Chicken burrito with salad and cheese
  • Small tin of tuna on crackers plus a banana

What is the best fluid to drink after exercise?

The ideal fluid during exercise depends on your goals. If you are using fluid mainly to rehydrate from the session than water or electrolyte drinks are a good option. If you are also drinking to meet your source of carbohydrate goals then sports drinks can be helpful as they contain both carbohydrates and fluid to help hydrate and fuel your body at the same time. Dairy based fluids such as smoothies and flavoured milk are especially handy if you want to protein, carbohydrate, fluid and electrolyte in one go. Specialised protein powders and recovery shakes may be useful in some situations for some people however, for many people their recovery goals can be met using regular foods and drinks.

For more information on this and other sports nutrition topics, subscribe to our newsletter or book to see an accredited sports dietitian.